Tag Archives: Meditation

How to make sure you meditate everyday

30 Sep

Extract from the article:

“These days, meditation for me is like brushing my teeth. Remember how it was when you were young? Your parents had to force you to brush your teeth. But now you do it every morning and night without being asked. Why? You do it because you know how much better you feel after you finish. You do it because you’d never get a date if you didn’t. You do it because you’d be embarrassed to talk to your coworkers with stinky breath and stuff stuck to your teeth. So you do it for yourself and you do it for others.

Do your meditation for the same reasons. Do it because you know how much better your interactions with others are on days when you do your meditation as opposed to days when you find some excuse to skip it. Do it because it makes your mind feel minty fresh! Then you won’t need any sure-fire tips.”

Here’s the article: How to make sure you meditate everyday

 

Watch the breathing, not the breath

26 Sep

It seems that many people, when they hear the suggestion to observe “the breathing,” take this as a suggestion to observe “the breath.” But the breathing and the breath are two very different things. The breath is air (or the sensation of air) flowing in and out of the body. The breathing is all and any sensation connected, however indirectly, with the process of air flowing in and out of the body. This potentially includes sensations from the whole body, since indirect sensations connected with the process of breathing can be experienced even in the hands and feet. But it at least involves the whole of the trunk of the body: the front, sides, and back of the chest and abdomen, sensations on the skin that covers those parts of the body, the shoulders, the spine — and of course air flowing through our airways.

When we’re paying attention to the breathing in this more expensive way, the practice becomes much more interesting. Focusing on just a small area of the breathing just doesn’t give the mind enough to do, and because the mind doesn’t like being under-occupied it invents distractions for itself. When we pay attention to many different sensations the mind has plenty to do, is less likely to go wandering, and is more engaged and absorbed.

This absorption can go even deeper than simply noticing lots of different sensations. Once we open ourselves to noticing sensations of breathing over the entire body (or at least a large part of the body) we can notice how those sensations are connected with each other and move together.

After all, the breathing is one process. No matter which sensations we observe, they’re all part of a single wave of movement driven by the movements of the diaphragm. Air flowing in and out of the nostrils, the rise and fall of the shoulders, the ever-changing pattern of sensation where our clothing moves over our skin, the movements in the spine, and of course the movements of the rib cage and of muscles in the abdomen — all of these are part of a wave of sensation, surging back and forth through our entire being.

Paying attention to the breathing as a body-wide, dynamic, rhythmic flow is far more engaging than observing just one small area of the breathing, and even more fascinating than observing several sensations at the same time. It brings about a deep level of absorption in which we can be content, calm, and fully engaged with our sensory experience.

By Bodhipaksa

(Wildmind Meditation)

Six ways to NOT Meditate

25 Sep

six ways not to meditate

Do you compete when meditating? Can you stay on the cushion longer than everyone else?

What about the results of your meditation? Are you efficiently achieving the targets?

Do you feel you are above all the other meditators and even the teacher at the front?

 

If such thoughts dominate your mind while meditating, you need to learn what NOT to do while meditating.

Download and read this piece by Ken McLeod here: 6 ways to not meditate

A Meditator’s Handbook

25 Sep

For those that follow the Goenka Vipassana technique, here’s a nice little handbook that summarizes the main teachings and techniques associated with this tradition.

Download and read this handbook, written by Bill Crecelius, here: A_Meditators_Handbook

Tibetan v/s Vipassana

3 Nov

A few months back I wrote and presented a short paper on my comparative experience with Tibetan and Vipassana (Goenka) styles of meditation retreats.

Here it is: Dhamma or Dharma

Is Meditation enough?

29 Jun

is meditation enough

“Meditation is used as therapy, to calm people down, as healing (to lower blood pressure, for instance, or deal with pain), and even as a way to get ahead in business, or win at sports. It is gradually becoming part of the mainstream. This is not unlike what has happened to the practice of yoga, once viewed as a sophisticated system of spiritual training, and now offered regularly. The technique may be there, but there is no heart. There is a danger that the practice of meditation could be similarly reduced. The very technique designed to undermine the power of ego-fixation could become another feather in our ego-cap.”

~ Judy Lief is a senior student of Chögyam Trungpa, Rinpoche, who authorized her as a teacher in the Buddhist and Shambhala traditions.

 

What do you think she means by “The technique may be there, but there is no heart”?

 

Read more here –> Is meditation enough

 

Guided Meditation – Ajahn Brahm

22 Jun

Here’s a lovely guided meditation – beginner’s level.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ev6KK5M38r4?rel=0&w=640&h=360]
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